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Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    15
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    Best way to do patches?

    I have three Bravo machines. I'm currently doing patches by using scrap fabric, doing the sewout and cutting around the frabic upon completion. I've also used tear-away applique material from Stahls, but wasn't really too fond of that.

    Anyone have some ideas?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eureka, California
    Posts
    604
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    You can make blanks, where you outline the area using a normal walking stitch, and cut it out prior to sewing.

    Open your design, and as the first color, make a line of walking stitches. You'll want to make this just a tiny, tiny bit inside of the border stitch. What you are making is the shape of the design, nothing else, as a walking stitch.

    When you have the area outlined just inside of the border, make that the first color on your design, AND copy it to the clipboard. Just the walking stitch you just created. Nothing else.

    Save your design.

    Now open a new window, and paste that shape you just saved to the clipboard into the window. Paste it multiple times into the shape of the large frame...as many as you need or that will fit.

    Prepare your fabric by ironing it with starch, and sticky spraying it to a layer of backing. Get all of the wrinkles out. Hoop tight, load the multiples design in the huge hoop you just created, and press sew.

    Cut them all out as close to exactly along the thread as humanly possible.

    To make one patch, hoop your backing in your normal one-patch hoop. Open the design in design shop, and load to machine. Sew the first color (the outline shape you just sewed). Stop the machine.

    Remove hoop from machine.

    Sticky spray the backing.

    Press your cut out shape onto the backing. Align the fabric as closely as possible to the outline stitch you just created.

    In the design you have digitized, be certain to sew your outline first (second color) . You'll want a 30 density underlay for the outline as a tack down, and then the normal border fill.

    Sounds complicated! But very easy and gives professional results.

    Second method:

    Purchase a roll of iron-on glue at the fabric store. Iron it onto the back of your fabric, then remove the backing and iron it onto the stabilizer.

    Hoop and sew.

    Finish back of patches with iron-on vinyl.

    Cut everything all at once.

    The iron-on glue minimizes fraying after cutting, adhering the fabric to the stabilizer.

    Which one you use will depend on the application of the patch when it's done. Black-on-black for police patches, etc., I use the second method; everything else, the first.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    15
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    Thanks for the explanation Judy; is there any particular way to fix the look of patches such as this?

    https://imgur.com/a/nstlk

    I kinda don't like the white backing showing on the sides. I was more or less trying to go for a look such as this:

    https://imgur.com/a/nstlk

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eureka, California
    Posts
    604
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    After cutting out the blanks, when you hoop the backing to stick it onto, hoop a layer of wash away.

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